Alicia Bustos

July 24, 2016

July 24, 1950 —

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Vilma Heredia and Alicia Bustos in Marabu

Alicia is a veteran milonga organizer who had Mondays in Regin (now El Beso), so she is known as Alicia de Regin.  She attended the Pro Milonga Law event.

He said, she said

July 24, 2016

He:  It’s Gobbi, no?

She:  No, it’s Di Sarli.

He:  Are you certain?

She:  Absolutely.  I always want to dance Di Sarli, and never Gobbi.

Nestor Gonzalez

July 18, 2016

September 14, 1936 – March 14, 2016

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He hasn’t been around for a few months, so I called him today.  His niece answered the phone and told me the news of his passing.

16 Years of Lo de Celia Tango Club

July 16, 2016

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There were no empty seats at the anniversary.  The only one missing was our dear Celia Blanco.  The milonga continues as she desired.

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The cold night didn’t keep the diehard dancers from supporting their favorite milonga. Erwin kept the dance floor full with excellent tandas.

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The new organizers Carlos Vera and Fabiana Justo are there to continue the tradition of Lo de Celia Tango Club.

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It was too cold for an outdoor barbecue, but on the way home I saw neighbors in front of bonfires because they’ve been without electricity for five days.  The police were there to divert traffic.

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Ricardo Franquelo

July 14, 2016

July 14, 1944 —

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Tito was dancing at the recent Pro Milonga Law event in front of the city legislature building.

Interview

Exhibition in Cachirulo

The milonga law

July 12, 2016

The Association of Milonga Organizers held a milonga today in front of city hall to bring attention to the law they’ve tried to get passed to protect the milongas.  Hundreds of dancers came to show their support.

NI UNA MILONGA MENOS

NI UNA CLAUSURA MAS

DEFENDAMOS NUESTRO TANGO

PROTEJAMOS LAS MILONGAS

FOMENTEMOS NUESTRO PATRIMONIO CULTURAL

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Omar Viola, the organizer of Parakultural for more than 20 years, was there telling people about the law they proposed to the city legislature.  I interviewed Daniel Rezk, an organizer of two milongas in Club Gricel, to tell me about the law in English.

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Tito Palumbo, editor of Buenos Aires Tango magazine, is always on the scene for tango.  He reminded me that he wrote the text for the proposed milonga law in 2012, but most don’t know he is its author.

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The legislature palace is getting a facelift, hence the scaffolding.

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Julio Duplaa and Graciela Lopez enjoyed a tango.

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Vilma Heredia, a veteran milonga organizer, came to support the law.

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Local milongueros came to support the protest for the milonga law.

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The city hall palace is undergoing renovation.

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Dancers didn’t complain about dancing on cobblestones to support the cause.

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Many came to watch the dancing and listen to the music.

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The workman had the best view of the milonga from above.

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The milongas and practicas in public spaces are non-profit.

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Julio Duplaa gave an interview for public television during the event.

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The street vendors were patient for a few hours while the milonga received media attention.  Let’s hope they gained the eyes and ears of city legislators (such as Susana Rinaldi) for support of the milonga law.

Antonio Ignacio Cejas

July 11, 2016

July 11, 1934 —

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When Antonio returned to Lo de Celia on June 19 after a month absence, I asked about his health.  He told me that he had lost his wife in May after 54 years of marriage.

200 Years of Independence

July 10, 2016

This July 9th wasn’t just another Independence Day for Argentina, it was the 200th anniversary of independence from Spain.  Many events took place around the city, and I chose to attend the international parade of military bands in Palermo at the Polo Grounds since I’m a big fan of marching bands.

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The military band of Bolivia started off the parade at 11:00 a.m.

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These young women in the Argentine Coast Guard stayed in step.

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I had to ask if their rifles had ammunition.

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This was the walk back after marching miles down Av. del Libertador.

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There were hundreds of young cadets from the many branches of  service participating in the parade.

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I had to get a close-up of the camouflage makeup on this soldier who reminded me of The Hulk.

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You can tell from their uniforms and boots that they rode horses.

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This helmet was impressive with a horse hair tail.

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Check out the fancy riding boots.

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The federal police women wanted a photo with this handsome guy in uniform.

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You don’t have a military parade without horses.

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This is when I thought about the incredible organization for the parade — military marching bands, service men and women, and then all the horses!

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Each branch has a different breed of horses.

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The parade lasted three and a half hours, ending with the combat veterans from the Las Malvinas war.  I didn’t take any photos of them because my hands were busy applauding the veterans.

People entered the Polo Grounds to watch the military bands perform on the field — Uruguay, Brasil, Perú, Chile, Paraguay, Bolivia, France, Spain, Italy, United States Navy Band, and Marrakesh, Morocco.  Argentina had several bands in the parade.

After the parade, I went home to watch the military bands for two hours on public television.  It was an amazing six-hour event, and thousands went to watch it.  Everyone had a flag in hand.  Viva la patria!

 

 

Buenos Aires is a great city for retirement

July 8, 2016

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Buenos Aires is a great city for walking and handholding.  There is no need to have a car when public transportation takes you everywhere.

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Buenos Aires is a great city for retirement

July 7, 2016

Not only is the city’s cultural agenda incredible, but the venues are architectural jewels.  I visited these four in one week of concerts.

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The former national library (opened in 1902) at Mexico 564 is the Centro Nacional de la Musica, permanent home for the Ballet Folklorico Nacional and other  arts organizations.  Their rehearsals are occasionally open to the public with a limited capacity.

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Teatro Colon opened in 1908 and is considered one of the finest concert halls of  the world.

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The dress rehearsal of Don Quijote Ballet was open to the public.  We had box seats at no charge.

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It’s always a thrill to attend a performance in this magnificent theater.

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The National Congress of Argentina opened in 1906.

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The Chamber Orchestra of Congress presents monthly concerts that are open to the public.

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Take note of the floor tile that is in perfect condition after a century.

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La Casa de la Cultura was built in 1898 as the offices of the second largest newspaper in Argentina, La Impresa.  Eventually the government bought the building for cultural purposes.

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Recitals are held in the magnificent Salon Dorado.

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The front door and the entrance of La Casa de la Cultura.

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I’m happy being retired in Buenos Aires with a full agenda of free concerts.


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