Keeping up with milonga changes

Twenty years ago, we consulted the one bi-monthly guide for the milonga schedule:  B.A. Tango – Buenos Aires Tango.  Tito Palumbo  discontinued publication in 2016 and changed to social media.  That’s the best and only way to keep up with the constant changes.

For example, I planned to meet two visitors at my regular place on Wednesday.  Then I learned that El Maipu wasn’t scheduled in Obelisco Tango as usual at 18 hs; it was temporarily relocated to La Nacional at 20 hs. I cancelled our plans.  If I hadn’t checked their page on Facebook, I wouldn’t have known.  The other source is Hoy-Milonga.com

And then Milonga de Los Consagrados in Centro Region Leonesa was mysteriously cancelled a few weeks ago.  The club’s board may have decided not to rent the salon out for milongas; the Friday milonga moved to La Nacional.  Los Consagrados also relocated to La Nacional one week and then to Casa de Galicia. Both places seat fewer than the 350 capacity at Salon Leonesa.  Tomorrow it’s scheduled in La Nacional, where there was a problem with the air-conditioning a couple of weeks ago.

I feel sorry for all the dancers who don’t have access to the internet.  They show up at their regular milonga, many after an hour of travel by bus, only to find the doors closed.

This week is the craziest month ever in terms of venue changes.  I’ve been on FB for a little more than a year.  I relied on Hoy-Milonga for the schedule, but didn’t always bother to check it before walking out the door.  Power outages are common during the summer months.

Tonight, Milonga de Buenos Aires, usually held in Obelisco Tango is taking place in Lo de Celia, a half a block away.  Repairs and painting are being done in Obelisco Tango (which I hope include the ladies room).  Obelisco seats 350, and Lo de Celia 150.  That means seven organizers scramble to find another place so they don’t have to cancel their milongas and lose money and patrons.  The entrance door was just painted.

The milonga organizers are not only fighting with the city government to stay alive, they have to deal with situations beyond their control to stay open.  It’s not easy running a milonga these days in Buenos Aires.

Do yourself a favor when visiting the milongas: always check the milonga’s Facebook page and Hoy-Milonga.com for confirmation it will be open when you arrive at the door.

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2 Responses to “Keeping up with milonga changes”

  1. Geoff Nicholls Says:

    Thanks Janis!

  2. jantango Says:

    When you are here in late April to dance in the milongas, you’ll know what to do. It’s anybody’s guess which milongas will be open and where.

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